Patient Care

Overall population health in U.S. has improved, but lags behind other wealthy nations July 18, 2013 | Journal of the American Medical Association
study on overall population health in U.S.
In a major study that includes data on the status of population health from 34 countries from 1990-2010, overall population health improved in the United States during this period, including an increase in life expectancy; however, illness and chronic disability now account for nearly half of the health burden. Improvements in the U.S. have not kept pace with advances in population health in other wealthy nations, according to the study published online by JAMA.
Intervention helps improve and maintain better blood pressure control July 09, 2013 | Journal of the American Medical Association
Intervention helps improve and maintain better blood pressure control
An intervention that consisted of home blood pressure telemonitoring with pharmacist management resulted in improvements in BP control and decreases in BP during 12 months, compared with usual care, and improvement in BP that was maintained for 6 months following the intervention, according to a study in the July 3 issue of JAMA.
MRI screening may help identify spinal infections from contaminated drug injections June 27, 2013 | Journal of the American Medical Association
MRI screening
Magnetic resonance imaging at the site of injection of a contaminated lot of a steroid drug to treat symptoms such as back pain resulted in earlier identification of patients with probable or confirmed fungal spinal or paraspinal infection, allowing early initiation of medical and surgical treatment, according to a study in the June 19 issue of JAMA.
An intervention consisting of clinician education coupled with personalized audit and feedback about antibiotic prescribing improved adherence to prescribing guidelines for common pediatric bacterial acute respiratory tract infections, although the intervention did not affect antibiotic prescribing for viral infections, according to a study in the June 12 issue of JAMA.
HPV vaccine
With the number of doses and cost of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines a barrier to global implementation, researchers have found that girls who received two doses of HPV vaccine had immune responses to HPV-16 and HPV-18 infection that were noninferior to (not worse than) the responses for young women who received three doses, according to a study in the May 1 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on child health. The authors note that more data on the duration of protection are needed before reduced-dose schedules can be recommended.
Hospital readmission for older patients often for different illness February 18, 2013 | Journal of the American Medical Association
Among approximately 3 million Medicare patients hospitalized for heart failure, heart attack or pneumonia, readmissions were frequent throughout the 30 days following the hospitalization, and resulted from a wide variety of diagnoses that often differed from the cause of the index hospitalization, according to a study appearing in the January 23/30 issue of JAMA.
Vitamin D shows no major effect on pain or slowing progression of knee osteoarthritis January 24, 2013 | Journal of the American Medical Association
In a two year randomized trial, patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis who received vitamin D supplementation did not have a significant difference in knee pain or cartilage volume loss compared to patients who received placebo, according to a study appearing in the Jan. 9 issue of JAMA.
Among rescue and recovery workers exposed to the dust, debris and fumes following the World Trade Center terrorist attack, there was an increased incidence of prostate and thyroid cancers and multiple myeloma, although it is not clear how big a factor medical screening and non-WTC risk factors contributed to these increases, according to a study in the Dec. 19 issue of JAMA. The authors did not find a statistically significant increased incidence for all cancer sites combined, and note that the findings on the three cancers that did increase should be viewed with caution for several reasons, including that they were based on a small number of cancers, multiple comparisons and a relatively short follow-up time.

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