Med-resistant hypertension more prevalent in patients with CKD


Med-resistant hypertension more prevalent in patients with CKDPhoto used with permission from Shuttershock.com

According to research from the University of Alabama’s Birmingham School of Public Health, more than 50 percent of patients who suffer from moderate kidney disease also have a degree of hypertension that is resistant to medications.

Furthermore, the study finds that those who have a larger waist circumference, are black, have diabetes and/or a history of heart attacks or strokes are at higher risk for the med-resistant condition.

Researchers examined the records of 10,700 patients who were treated with hypertension in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study. What they discovered was a significant, graded association between worsening kidney function and the presence of resistant hypertension.

By way of these findings, lead researchers Rikki Tanner, MPH, and Paul Muntner, PhD, along with the rest of their study team, hope to establish with providers another benchmark for determining whether specific patients need more intensive monitoring/care. What’s more, with some 60 million people worldwide diagnosed with chronic kidney disease, it’s imperative that clinicians have methods in place to decrease further wellness unrest.

"These data indicate that resistant hypertension is a common condition among individuals with kidney disease, suggesting the need for greater awareness of this comorbidity among clinicians," said Tanner in a news release. "The identification of individuals at high risk of developing resistant hypertension who may benefit from intensive blood pressure monitoring and early therapeutic interventions -- such as treatment for secondary hypertension, referral to a hypertension specialist, and cessation of medications that increase blood pressure -- should be a high priority.”

The study was published in the latest issue of Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology(CJASN).

Photo used with permission from Shuttershock.com.